The Washington Post reports that congress has passed the warrentless wiretapping expansion the executive branch had requested:

The bill would give the National Security Agency the right to collect such communications in the future without a warrant. But it goes further than that: It also would allow the interception and recording of electronic communications involving, at least in part, people “reasonably believed to be outside the United States” without a court’s order or oversight.

[…]

Under the administration’s version of the bill, the director of national intelligence and the attorney general can authorize the surveillance of all communications involving foreign targets. Oversight by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, composed of federal judges whose deliberations are secret, would be limited to examining whether the government’s guidelines for targeting overseas suspects are appropriate. The court would not authorize the surveillance.

I have never understood the conflation of judicial oversight with executive weakness. The ACLU has condemned the Senate for passing the bill.